@Hull

A forums about Hull, by people from Hull.
 
HomeHome  CalendarCalendar  FAQFAQ  SearchSearch  MemberlistMemberlist  UsergroupsUsergroups  RegisterRegister  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Hull's Urban Legends

Go down 
AuthorMessage
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 175
Join date : 2010-06-04
Age : 39
Location : Kingston upon Hull

PostSubject: Hull's Urban Legends   Sat Jun 05, 2010 3:45 am

Hull Prudential Building – The Truth.
Hull Daily Mail today revealed that Martin Taylor, of the Hull City Archives, has discovered a document revealing the truth behind the horrific bombing and alleged burial of the bodies.
For years it has become local knowledge that the bodies were kept buried on the spot, under quick lime, as those that survived the bombing, died due to drowning from the use of fire hoses.
The truth of the matter is far more mundane.
City engineer and surveyor William Morris made a confidential report stating that 16 people perished, and names all but 6. It also states that the bodies were removed prior to the Prudential Tower being demolished.
The find occured during the removal and classification of documents from the City Archives Centre on Lowgate and Centre on Trippet street, to the combined History Centre on Mason street.
Over the years, local businesses have reported paranormal activity, possibly as a knock on affect of the horrific bombing campaign.

King William Public House
The Sign

This is the first of two myths associated with this public house opposite the statue on Market Place.
The pub allegedly got it’s name from the statue of King William the 3rd, which stands opposite, but the sign on the public house is King William the 4th!
Local myths suggest that the pub was named after the statue, but, the building dates back to the 1830’s, when a coffee house was first reported here, when King William the 4th was King of the United Kingdom.
Sadly we will never know the truth behind the origins of the name

King William Public House
The Uninvited Guest
It is alleged that when the bells of the Holy Trinity Church strike 13, the statue of King William the 3rd, dismounts his horse, and walks over to the public house on Market Place.
The story of course, is nothing more than myth, but over the years it has been helped by playful drinkers, who have often left footprints in the snow, leading from the statue to the pub!

King Billy Statue
Did the creator committ suicide?
The statue was created by Dutch sculptor Peter Scheemaker and funded by a public subscription of £893!
The idea was to have King William III dressed as a Roman Emporer, hence, no stirrups, and was unveiled on 4th of December 1734.
The reason why we have the statue is becuase King William was seen as "The Great Deliverer" from Roman Catholic ambitions.
Contrary to popular belief, the sculptor did not committ suicide, but died in 1781 as a 90 year old man.
The reason why the statue was unveiled on 4th December as this was initially known as "Town Taking Day" to commemorate the taking of the town Citadel off the Catholic Governor by the Protestants
Where did the myth come from?
The myth of the sculptor killing himself pertains to William Day Keyworth, who had created sculptures of Wilberforce, Marvell and De La Pole. He was found with a single gunshot wound to the head, at his property off Spring Bank.

White Hart Public House
When does the pub date from?

It is commonly thought that the White Hart Public House on Alfred gelder Street dates from 1902. The fact of the matter is, the White Hart is much older.
The earliest mention of the pub dates back to 1803, when Miles Tennant is recorded as the owner and the address is given as Salthouse Lane.
100 years later, Alfred Gelder street is built, and much of the old pub fronting Salthouse Lane is destroyed and expanded to reach the newly opened thoroughfare, thus giving the pub a 1902 build date.
Over the years it has had numerous name changes, around the White Hart Theme. White Hart Inn, White Hart Tavern, and White Hart Hotel.

Ye Olde Black Boy
Smugglers Tunnels

It has long being suggested that Ye Olde Black Boy has hidden smuggling tunnels but during recent surveys, these where shown to be nothing more than drainage tunnels, and much to small for anyone to fit down!
Several so called "Paranormal Investigators" in Hull still claim that these smugglers tunnels exist, despite evidence from previous owners and archeological digs in the area, showing no such tunnels.

Ye Olde Black Boy
When does it date from?

Much has been written about the date and origins of the little pub on Hull’s High Street. The plot of land, which the pub stands on, first appeared in 1347, when Gastryk House was built on this site, but the first mention of the premises occurs in 1729, when William and Mary Smith are registered here.
Over the years it has been a fish merchants, coffee shop, brothel, Corn Merchants, Wine and Spirit Merchants and of course the pub.
There are 2 suggestions as to the name of the pub.
Charles the 2nd was nicknamed "The Black Boy" and the pub was named in his honour.
The second theory relates to an alleged Moroccan boy, who stood outside the old coffee house!
Sadly, we will never know the truth.
There are numerous tales of the paranormal associated with this building.

Old Zoological
Is it really that old?

The original Zoological stood on Beverley Road on what is now The Hull Daily Mail Offices. The first known appearance of the pub occured in 1815, when Mrs Dunn of the Ship Inn advertised her premises.
By 1840, the Ship Inn had become the Zoological Hotel, coinciding with the opening of the Zoological Gardens on Spring Bank.
The pub closed in 1985 to be demolished, with Blundells Corner being cleared for the building of the new Hull Daily Mail offices.
The Old Zoological Pub opened on Princess Ave shortly after this date, closer to what would have been the original Zoological Gardens!

Ye Olde White Hart
Is the pub really that old?

What is verifiable fact is that in 1639, Wenceslas Hollar, a renowned etcher from Prague, accompanied King Charles I to Hull to draw a plan of the important buildings and military establishments in the walls of the town. Hollar’s plan of 1640 shows the area around Bowlalley lane and Land of Green Ginger to have several buildings but no White Hart. Why would the building, said to have been the home of the Town’s Governor, not be on the map, that was made to show areas of military importance? Could it be, that the building wasn’t built then? Interestingly several local historians wrote histories of Hull and none made any mention of this property being the home of Sir John Hotham.
Among them, Abraham De La Pryme, who wrote his work in 1700, but it remained unpublished until 1986, Thomas Gent, who wrote his work in 1735, and Hadley, who wrote his work in 1788.
Why would contempory historians not mention such an important detail in Hull’s history?
Recent reports on the structure indicate the brickwork being no older then the 1660’s, thus indicating that the building could not have been there for Hollar to draw, and certainly not have been there for Sir John Hotham to have been housed in.
So, when do we first learn that the building belonged to Sir John Hotham?
The earliest known publication is Sheahan’s History of Hull 1864, in which he mentions that the building was, “Supposed to have been the residence of Sir John Hotham” Could it be that this was nothing more than a Victorian myth, that over the years, has grown to become accepted fact?
One final note, is that Hotham was assigned to watch Hull's magazine, which at this time, was kept in Suffolk Palace.

Cornmill Hotel
Is this an old building?

Cornmill Hotel is a fairly recent addition to Holderness road but stands on the site of the former Holderness Steam Mill, which dates back to 1831.
The Steam Mill consisted of 2 buildings, an engine house, and the steam mill itself. The current hotel was built to the same design of the former steam mill! The mill is allegedly haunted by the former owner's daughter!

St Mary’s Church and Air Street Cemetery
Do monks walk these grounds?

The graveyard was the burial ground of St Mary’s Anglican Church which was first mention in 1232, with the first ever drawing dating from 1725. By 1759 this was replaced by a newer building and between 1827 and 1830 the church was altered again. More alterations took place between 1861-63. By 1869 the church was replaced as the parish church of Sculcoates by Church of all saint’s Margret Street. St Mary’s was demolished in 1916, with most of the brickwork being taken to the New St Mary’s on Sculcoates Lane.
No mention has ever been made of monks or monesteries in this area of Sculcoates. There have been several stories regarding the paranormal and this cemetery.

Sculcoates Cemeteries
It is believed that the cemeteries on Sculcoates lane, was once one large cemetery.
The facts are,
Prior to the 19th Century, most Sculcoates Burials took place in St Mary’s Church yard, which is now commonly known as Air-street Cemetery.
By 1818 a second cemetery was opened on the South Side of Sculcoates Lane.
By the 1890’s a third cemetery was opened on the North Side of Sculcoates Lane.
Thus giving us three cemeteries, not one large cemetery split into smaller plots. There have been several stories regarding the paranormal and these cemeteries.

Whitefriargate
Origin of Name?

It has been suggested that Whitefriargate takes it’s name from the Beverley Gate, which once stood at the West end of this medieval thoroughfare, but the name originated long before the gate exsisted.
The White Friar relates to the Carmelite Friars, that once occupied the South side of the street. They wore White robes, hence White Friar’s!
The Gate originates from the word Gata, which translates as "Street" and is European in origin. A throwback to the days when Hull/Wyke used to import and export wool and other such commodities to our European neighbours. There are several properties along this busy street that are allegedly haunted!

Hull Fishermen and P-I-G's
Hull's fisherfolk have a long proud tradition of superstitions, myths and urban legends, and the tale of the PIG, is is just one of many. My attention was first drawn to this tale way back in 1995, when it appeared in Fortean Times issue 84 in an article by Alec Gill. Mr. Gill takes us through the age od traditions of fisherfolk, discussing the superstition that they could not discuss, or even say "PIG" for fear of bad luck. Whilst this might seem silly to most, Hull fisherfolk took it very seriously, and to this day, I am aware of people referring to the animal as a "P-I-G" opting to spell it rather than say it.
It's quite possible the tale had it's origins elsewere, as during the 1840's fishermen travelled from Brixam upto Hull, and settled with their families here. It is said that Brixham fishermen would never take pork to sea with them.
There are also several references in the Bible to pigs drowing in the sea, one in Mark 5:1-20, where Jesus casts out the demons of a possessed man, into 2,000 pigs, which in turn run into the sea and drown!
Perhaps over the years, different religious beliefs, mixed with different superstitions, have created new myths, but whatever the case, this story is here to stay.

School Myths and Urban Legends
We all had them at school, from the haunted room, which was nothing more than a locked room, forcing us to ask the question, "Why is it locked?" and leading to answer, "Because it's haunted!" to myths involving imminent attacks by rival schools!

School Myths-The Haunted Room
I remember at both Primary and Secondary school hearing tales of haunted rooms, which in hindsight were simply locked to stop mischief and mayhem, but as the stories progressed, like chinese whispers, they grew, until it was "Haunted by one of the old teaching staff that had passed away from stress due to the children..." Of course, it was all nonesense, but it happened at most schools. I recall my wife telling me about her primary School, which had a haunted bush, and the children wouldn't go near it. Before long, tales of red eyes, and growls had passed from class to class, and verified, at least to the children, that there was something in the bush.
In all honesty, it was probably the teachers telling the children not to go near the bush, as it was close to the gates, and over the years the children added to the warning with tales of evil, hiding in the bush!
That's not to say that there are not legitimate cases of hauntings at schools, in fact, over the last three years, I have recieved tales from several of Hull's Educational Centres, all from seemingly reliable witnesses, such as teachers, and caretakers!

School Myths-War is Imminent.
I can remember the social groupings of children at my secondry school. There was the lower level kids that concentrated on their studies and were labled "geeks," the intermdiate level, that did their studies, but enjoyed participating in sports, then the higher tier of sporty popular kids, that some would call "Jocks."
Every once in a while a rallying cry would echo across the school yard, forcing the upper tier kids to leave the rear entrance, which led to an old railway track, and head for the rival school. More often than not they never reached their destination, and on a couple of occasions they all met halfway, resulting in a mini battle, which always drew the attention of the local police.
On certain occasions, when the popular sporty kids were playing sports out of the school, the cry would once again echo across the school yard, this time informing the remaining children that the rival school was on the way. When this occured, those that were left behind were often forced to find shelter or a place to hide, awaiting the imminent attack. On a few occasions the rallying cry was greeted by kids heading to the track, ready to defend their school.
But the attacks never happened, instead, it always turned out to be a hoax, which still happens to this day, and still sends shivers down the spines of those left behind.

James Henwood esq Cursed Portrait
Wilberforce House is one of the finest museums in Hull, and birthplace of William Wilberforce, but did you know about the cursed portrait that hangs in the house? The portrait is of James Henwood Esq, the last resident of the property, before it became used as commercial properties and later under the ownership of Hull Corporation.
The portrait was said to have been moved some years ago, and the two young lads that carried it, are both said to have died in mysterious circumstances!
Recently, the portrait was moved from one room to another next door, but as of yet, no fatalities have been reported!

Burglary scent scam 'urban myth'
This is the latest Urban Legend/Myth to strike Kingston upon Hull, and one that has had some people worried that it could happen to them!
Reports have being circulated on mobile phone messages that would-be thieves are knocking on doors in the area with perfume samples. When the samples are smelt, a person is knocked unconscious and the thief is then free to burgle the property. However, Humberside Police denied that this was happening, and had to resort to the BBC to spread the message, stating,
"A variation of the same theme has also been circulated warning of a similar robbery method.
"Again, this is untrue and Humberside Police have received no reports of crimes being committed in this way."

So there we have it, nothing more than a myth.....

England Flag and Shirt Ban
This one appeared in 2010 in the run up to the World Cup and was spread across several social networking sites. After a phone call from Humberside Police, and a subsequent press release, which denied that England Shirts and Flags are illegal in Hull, the hysteria settled, although some still claim that a "friend of a friend" as been told to remove their flags!
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://hull.aforumfree.com
alanmackinnon

avatar

Posts : 120
Join date : 2010-06-04
Age : 79
Location : West Hull

PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   Sat Jun 05, 2010 2:33 pm

Hi Mike, really interesting piece on Hull myths. One of the items rings a bell in my mind. When I was a teenager I sailed on the trawlers as a galley lad for four or five trips and whilst I was at sea I got in terrible trouble with one of the old deckies for using two words; P*I*G and R*A*T. These words were anathema to the old fisher folk and they would always use the terms "curly tail" and "long tail". Just a small point about the rich heritage of our great city.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Trev

avatar

Posts : 29
Join date : 2010-06-04
Age : 61
Location : Longhill

PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   Sat Jun 05, 2010 8:05 pm

I used to know a trawlerman's daughter (sounds like the first line of a limerick!), and she would never say 'rat'...would only ever spell it out. I recall reading somewhere or other of a couple of lads who, for a laugh, threw a pigs tail onto a trawler as it passed out through the lock gates at St Andrews. The crew refused to go any further and the boat returned to its berth. Has anyone else heard of this?

Tunnels in the old town: My daughter has just rented a flat in Bowlalley Lane, and the laundry room is downstairs in the basement. I've already had a bit of a nosey around, and there are all sorts of bricked up doorways down there. Would love to go exploring further!
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 175
Join date : 2010-06-04
Age : 39
Location : Kingston upon Hull

PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   Mon Jun 07, 2010 1:51 am

Thanks Alan, I had not heard of RAT. A new one to the list.

As for the Tunnels Trev, they do exist, although not at the Black Boy. A couple of years ago I was visiting several of the pubs in the old Town area and made at stop at Ye Olde Corn Exchange. The staff and landlord were really friendly, and invited me to take a look at their cellar area, which had three large arches all bricked up.

The story goes that one of them led to Princess Dock and stopped at what was The Tunnel Bar. The other was said to have gone to Ye Olde White Hart, and the third was said to have gone in the direction of Humber-street.

The landlord remarked that they were blocked up after people were found exploring them. He believes they were erected to form an underground away from the eyes of the Customs and Excise men.

In more recent years I was in a position of luck and granted a VIP tour of The Royal Station Hotel. I walked down the back stairs, which were used by bell boys and room service, and visited the subterranean chambers down below. I found it interesting that the Hotel had a blocked up tunnel, with a story that it reached all the way to Beverley!

In another area under the hotel was a tunnel which was so small one would have to crawl through. It was said to have been used to smuggle immigrants from the old Immigration room (Tigers Lair) under the station to the Hotel for the purpose of cheap labour.

Sadly, these stories cannot be confirmed, but I would love to investigate them further.
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://hull.aforumfree.com
alanmackinnon

avatar

Posts : 120
Join date : 2010-06-04
Age : 79
Location : West Hull

PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   Mon Jun 07, 2010 4:22 pm

On the subject of superstitions involving the seafaring folk, Mike, did you know of the one that if you whistle whilst at sea you used to be liable to be threatened with being dumped over the side since whistling was anathema. Apparently it was believed that you would whistle up the wind. Strangely enough, the same superstition applies in the theatrical world, although I have never been able to find out why whistling would be considered unlucky in the theatre.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 175
Join date : 2010-06-04
Age : 39
Location : Kingston upon Hull

PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   Tue Jun 08, 2010 2:33 am

The Origin of whistling in the theatre pertains to the usage of a sailors whistle, and goes something like this; Before the advent of walkie-talkies or communications systems, cues for theatre technicians were called with a sailors whistle. Therefore, one who whistles in a theatre may, inadvertantly, call a cue before it's time, setting all types of catastrophy into motion. It is often said that the person who whistles, would get fired, making the superstition come true.
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://hull.aforumfree.com
AR-Tony

avatar

Posts : 69
Join date : 2010-06-04
Location : Why here of course! Where else?

PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   Tue Jun 08, 2010 3:40 am

Hi Mike, you referred to the subterranean elements of Royal Station Hotel... Part of the basement area was once rigged out for a resident barber. It was there that the evil Bertram Holmes plied his trade. He was the one who, along with his dreadful sidekick, tried to trap me at Holmes' own ladies hair dressing salon. Shiver.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Admin
Admin
avatar

Posts : 175
Join date : 2010-06-04
Age : 39
Location : Kingston upon Hull

PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   Wed Jun 09, 2010 2:15 am

Wow, funny you should mention that. When I was on the tour, I was told that "Beyond this wall is a barbershop, but for some reason, it was bricked up"

No one who works at the hotel knew why it was bricked up, but if you have more information, I am willing to do some digging. I have Friday booked in at the History Centre and this story really grabs my imagination.
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://hull.aforumfree.com
annielol



Posts : 1
Join date : 2012-05-13

PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   Sun May 13, 2012 8:27 am

Just joined this forum has i was looking for info about Berty Holmes . He lived/ worked on Holderness Rd in the early 70,s. My hubby has been telling me about the murders back then , did,nt realise he was linked to Station Hotel too .
Back to top Go down
View user profile
wizzles



Posts : 1
Join date : 2014-05-13

PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   Tue May 13, 2014 10:02 am

Aarrgggg .. i accidentally found your forum whilst helping my daughter with homework on Hull's history, stumbled across the last couple of posts about Bertram Holmes and found myself totally fascinated as i have never heard of the him and the posts just hang.......

Has anyone found any information on him and what were his crimes, what happened to him etc,  i've been sucked in and im desperate to know now. I've quizzed people who where around in the 70's and they have never heard of him, the internet just pulls up this forum. please put me out of my misery.

Many thanks

Sam x


Last edited by wizzles on Tue May 13, 2014 10:09 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : spelling)
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Alfie the dog



Posts : 2
Join date : 2015-01-05

PostSubject: Bertram Holmes   Mon Jan 05, 2015 12:40 pm

I knew Bertram Holmes and would like any info on the murder in Hull, I do have some knowledge of him so any questions just ask. I am interested in rumours of barbers bricked up in Station Hotel....
Back to top Go down
View user profile
montyk

avatar

Posts : 1
Join date : 2015-03-28

PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   Sat Mar 28, 2015 10:55 am

There is some info on Bertram Holmes now available on the internet if you google the name. I cant add a link
as the forum won't allow me to add links to external web pages yet. Crying or Very sad
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Alfie the dog



Posts : 2
Join date : 2015-01-05

PostSubject: Bertram Holmes   Mon Mar 30, 2015 5:50 am

Thanks Monty, that has been updated, i knew Bertram and Alan and Geoffrey, when Geoffrey went missing i was told the same he had gone to Lomdon, i was not allowed at the trial so not seen transcript. But am more interested in the story of the barber in station hotel because i knew he worked there.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Hull's Urban Legends   

Back to top Go down
 
Hull's Urban Legends
Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» URBAN ICON Highpoint used to be called what???
» MARVEL LEGENDS ARES WAVE IN AUSTRALIA
» Marvel Legends 2012!
» Marvel Legends you would like to see
» Anyone have these Marvel Legends for sale??

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
@Hull :: Your first category :: Your first forum-
Jump to: